Equitable Development Initiative Application

  • Equitable Development Participants pose for group shot
  • EQUITABLE DEVELOPMENT INITIATIVE

Thank you for completing your application for the Equitable Development Initiative.

We plan to inform all applicants of our decision by the end of the year.

Questions? Please contact:

Jarrett Sanders, Detroit Program Manager
jsanders@capitalimpact.org | (313) 230-0147

Thank you for all of your efforts in helping to build a more equitable and inclusive city for all Detroiters!

STORIES OF IMPACT

Through capital and commitment, we help people and communities break the barriers to success. That impact is illustrated through minority developers that we have partnered with across the country to ensure that low-income communities have access to the critical social services they need to thrive. Here are a few of their stories.

 
Richard Hosey stands on the rooftop of one of his Detroit projects.

Kirby Center Lofts
When Richard Hosey returned to his hometown in 2008, the economic downturn had completely changed the city he remembered. With help from Capital Impact, the Detroit native has focused his efforts on returning the city to its former greatness through projects that foster inclusive growth for all residents.

Meet Richard

Man stands in room about to be renovated

2018 EDI Cohort Profiles
The EDI program launched with promising individuals representing a broad spectrum of community development expertise. Follow along as we take a deep dive with three participants to learn more about their backgrounds and their future plans.

Meet The Cohort Team

Sam Shina cuts the ribbon at the Imperial FreshMarket Grand Opening

Imperial Fresh Market
An immigrant from Iraq, Sam Shina made Detroit his hometown in the 1980s and never left. Through good times and bad, residents have relied on his stores for healthy food options. His partnership with Capital Impact has helped him continue to grow and expand to meet residents’ needs.

Meet Sam

 

Building is in Her Blood

Alisha Moss’ grandmother is said to have built all of Lima, Ohio “with her bare hands” when her family lived there from the mid-1930s through the 1960s. She did this in an era when few women, and few African Americans, were involved in the construction industry. But the going was not easy. People of color could not get loans. In many cases they were not even allowed in the bank. So Moss’ grandmother either borrowed or bartered for tools as needed to support her family. That passion for building has stuck with Moss, as have many barriers to success in the industry. Hear directly from Alisha as she talks about how EDI is giving her an opportunity to be part of constructing Detroit’s future.

 

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